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Finding Strength in Special Interests: A New Way to Frame Autism

Christina Reuterskiold remembers a child client with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who loved to recite the dictionary. “She read the words perfectly fine, but she had no idea what they meant,” said Reuterskiold, a Speech@NYU professor and chair of NYU Steinhardt’s Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders. Despite not understanding what she was reading, the girl exhibited no interest in discussing anything else. In fact, she would start to scream if another topic was introduced. While some might have deemed the girl’s interest a limitation in her learning, Reuterskiold saw it as an opportunity. “Being able to decode new […]

Socializing with Aphasia

About 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is one of the most common causes of disability. One such potential after effect is aphasia, which affects the way stroke survivors communicate. A stroke, sometimes called a brain attack, happens when a clot blocks the blood supply to the brain or when a blood vessel in the brain bursts. During a stroke, the brain cells are deprived of oxygen and they begin to die. This can cause aphasia, a condition that impairs the expression and understanding of language and which […]

Career Outlook for Speech-Language Pathologists

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are responsible for more than the evaluation and treatment of speech and language disorders. Individuals in this field also work with clients on swallowing rehabilitation, auditory and reading comprehension, communication and social skills, and alternative methods of communication. Communication is central to human interaction and the field of speech-language pathology, which is projected to grow faster than the national average for all occupations in the next decade. 1 With regards to the SLP job outlook, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that 25,900 new SLPs will be needed by 2026 — 18 percent more than the 145,100 SLPs in the […]

Anticipation: Changing the Way We Think about Stuttering

Many people who stutter are able to identify a moment when they know they are about to trip up on a word or phrase. According to Eric S. Jackson, assistant professor at NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, that moment can be characterized as “anticipation” and is largely invisible to other people in conversation with someone who stutters. Jackson has conducted studies with adults, teens, and children who stutter and has explored the impact of anticipation on their flow of speech.1, 2 He has found that understanding anticipation and addressing it in therapeutic modalities can aid parents, educators, […]

How to Prepare for a Child’s First SLP Visit

Parenting a child who has recently been diagnosed with a communication, feeding, or swallowing disorder can be overwhelming. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are trained to work with clients facing a range of challenges and disorders across the life span. Parents may be tempted to compare their child’s growth to others, but it’s important to remember that children develop at their own pace. Speech and language skills vary among all children, so it’s critical for parents to consult a professional if they’re concerned about their child’s progression. Alicia Morrison, professor at Speech@NYU, the online SLP program from NYU Steinhardt, takes a collaborative approach during a child’s […]

Finding Strength in Special Interests: A New Way to Frame Autism

Christina Reuterskiold remembers a child client with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who loved to recite the dictionary. “She read the words perfectly fine, but she had no idea what they meant,” said Reuterskiold, a Speech@NYU professor and chair of NYU Steinhardt’s Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders. Despite not understanding what she was reading, the girl exhibited no interest in discussing anything else. In fact, she would start to scream if another topic was introduced. While some might have deemed the girl’s interest a limitation in her learning, Reuterskiold saw it as an opportunity. “Being able to decode new […]

Five Things to Consider When Applying to Speech@NYU

Speech@NYU, NYU's online master of science program in Communicative Sciences and Disorders, offers a rigorous online speech-language pathology (SLP) curriculum, adhering to the same standards of excellence as the on-campus program in preparing aspiring clinicians to pursue licensure as speech-language pathologists (SLPs). If you're thinking about applying to the online program, below are a few factors to consider.

Tips for Taking the Praxis Exam

The Praxis exam in Speech-Language Pathology is one of the requirements for obtaining state licensure as a speech-language pathologist. For some, the Praxis seems like an overwhelming step along the path toward becoming a licensed SLP. With this in mind, we've compiled some helpful information to assist you in preparing for the exam.