Course Descriptions

The Speech@NYU curriculum offers a diverse set of courses, ensuring you receive the comprehensive education you need to treat a variety of communicative disorders as a speech-language pathologist.

Foundation Courses

If you have not completed certain undergraduate courses (earning a "B" or better) prior to enrolling in the program, you may be required to complete up to 14 credits of additional foundation course work. We offer these courses online to prepare you for your master’s studies.

The required foundation courses are:

Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Swallow Mechanism – 2 Credits

This course is a comprehensive study of the anatomical and physiological bases of speech production and swallowing. Structures and mechanics of respiration, phonation, resonation, articulation, and swallowing are studied.

Neurological Bases of Cognition, Behavior, and Communication – 2 Credits

This course is a comprehensive study of the neurological bases of speech and language production, speech and language perception, and swallowing. The neurological bases of language, respiration, phonation, resonation, articulation, speech perception, and swallowing are studied.

Introduction to Audiology and Aural Rehabilitation – 2 Credits

This course is a study of the anatomical and physiological bases and mechanics of hearing perception, covering principles and techniques of pure tone and speech audiometry and interpretation of audiograms. Considerations include etiologies and auditory characteristics of major types of hearing impairments and principles and management of the hearing impaired across the life span.

Phonetics – 2 Credits

This course is a study of the production, description, and classification of speech sounds; English sounds, stress, and intonation; phonemes and allophones; ear training; and phonetic and phonemic transcription using IPA.

Science of Language – 2 Credits

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of the human language faculty, focusing on the cognitive and neural processing mechanisms that underlie linguistic knowledge and use. We describe contemporary approaches to delineating levels of language structure and review various scientific methodologies used to study language. Topics include language knowledge and use as well as language change and variation.

Language Development and Disorders in Children – 2 Credits

This course focuses on typical development of language in children and associated conditions, such as hearing impairment, intellectual handicaps, and autism. Typical and atypical language development will be discussed with special reference to the various communication components: form (structure), content (semantics), and use (pragmatics). Implications for the facilitation of language acquisition in children exhibiting delays or disorders of language development will be reviewed. Basic principles of assessment and intervention and the role of the speech-language pathologist will be covered.

Prerequisites: Neurological Bases of Cognition, Behavior, and Communication and Science of Language.

Speech Development and Disorders – 2 Credits

The objective of this course is to develop a broad understanding of the process by which typically developing children acquire speech skills. The course will review theoretical aspects of speech development and focus on the complexities of normal human communication. This content will lay the foundation for discussing etiologies and characteristics of speech sound disorders that arise across the life span. Basic principles of assessment and intervention and the role of the speech-language pathologist will be covered.

Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Swallow Mechanism and Phonetics.

Please note: You must complete most of these foundation courses prior to enrolling in graduate-level courses. If you have not taken some or all of the foundation courses listed above, you must complete them in addition to the 48 credits of graduate-level courses required for the master’s degree.

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Instrumentation and Research Courses

Critical Evaluation of Research in Speech and Hearing Sciences and Disorders – 2 credits

This course offers a consideration of the formulation and design of research problems and the collection, processing, and interpretation of data. The course also covers evaluation of research in speech and speech pathology and audiology.

Prerequisites: None.

Speech Science: Instrumentation – 2 credits

This course is an advanced and detailed study of the current instrumentation used to evaluate the acoustic, aerodynamic, and physiological aspects of speech production in clinical settings and in speech research. Students will gain expertise in the instrumental evaluation of normal subjects.

Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Swallow Mechanism and Phonetics.

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Disorder Courses

Motor Speech Disorders – 3 credits

This course focuses on the etiology, neuroanatomy, and symptoms of common neurological disorders and associated motor speech problems. Types and differential diagnosis of dysarthria and apraxia are explored. A hypotheses-based context for assessment and treatment is used to form hierarchies and estimate prognosis. We will use a patient-centered and evidence-based practice framework to discuss the impact of multicultural and psychosocial factors on the patient’s participation in rehabilitation.

Prerequisites: All foundation courses.
Recommended pre- or corequisites: Adult Language Disorders and Voice Disorders.

Adult Language Disorders – 3 credits

This course is an introduction to the historical, linguistic, and psychological rationales for the evaluation and treatment of verbal impairment secondary to brain damage. Clinical tests, contemporary research, and treatment methodology are reviewed.

Prerequisites: Neurological Bases of Cognition, Behavior, and Communication; Phonetics; and Science of Language.

Fluency Disorders – 3 credits

This course offers a review of the most recent theories of stuttering behavior and the clinical procedures that flow from them. Differential diagnostic techniques, their interpretation, and implications for treatment of programmed and non-programmed nature are discussed.

Pre- or corequisites: Language Disorders in Children and Speech Sound Disorders in Children.

Language Development and Disorders in School-Aged Children – 3 credits

This course is a study of the developmental reading and writing processes in children with speech and language disorders, the relationships of speech and oral language skills to those processes, reading disabilities, and the role of the speech-language pathologist working with school-aged children.

Prerequisites: All foundation courses and Language Disorders in Children.

Voice Disorders – 3 credits

This course considers the anatomic, physiologic, acoustic, and perceptual aspects of normal voice and selected voice problems across the life span. A hypothesis-driven context and patient-centered framework is used to develop protocols for prevention of voice problems, identification of risk factors, and promotion of efficient phonation. We will discuss the impact of multicultural and psychosocial factors on voice. Participation in labs links motor learning theory to manner of phonation and facilitates development of goals and identification of appropriate procedures.

Prerequisites: All foundation courses.
Pre- or corequisite: Speech Science: Instrumentation.

Language Disorders in Children – 3 credits

This course is an examination of assessment and remediating of language disorders associated with varied etiological factors. The course considers cognitive and pragmatic aspects of language and focuses on the determination of goals and intervention procedures for children from the paralinguistic stage through the school years.

Prerequisites: All foundation courses.

Dysphagia in Children and Adults – 3 credits

This course offers a description of swallowing disorders in children and adults associated with various structural, neurological, and behavioral disorders. Assessment and remediating approaches will be addressed.

Taken concurrently with Clinical Field Placement III: Treatment.
Prerequisites: All foundation courses.
Recommended pre- or corequisites: Voice Disorders and Motor Speech Disorders.

Principles of Intervention with Speech-Language Disorders – 2 credits

This course offers principles of problem solving and decision making involved in intervention planning across communication-disorder types. Students learn to use diagnostic data in formulating goals and procedures of treatment. Sources of knowledge underlying goal and procedure development, including the nature of language, baseline data, factors maintaining communication disorders, and language learning theories, are addressed.

Taken concurrently with Clinical Practicum II: Diagnostic Assessment and On-Campus Clinical Immersion.
Prerequisites: All foundation courses.

Speech Sound Disorders in Children – 3 credits

This course emphasizes research in phonological development and the application of theories of development to assessment and intervention procedures with the phonologically impaired. Phonological disorders are analyzed within the framework of a linguistic system, with reference to distinctive features, phonological rules, and simplification processes.

Prerequisites: All foundation courses.

Multicultural Issues in Communicative Sciences and Disorders – 2 credits

This course introduces diverse populations and explores how differences among both individuals and cultures in terms of gender, age, race, socioeconomic background, sexual orientation, religion, language, dialect, or country of origin affect interpersonal and group communication as well as clinical practice. Topics are devoted to improving cultural competence considerations for understanding, evaluating, and remediation of communication and swallowing disorders in culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) populations. The course is designed to improve students’ effectiveness as clinicians with diverse clients and to help prepare them for today’s workplace setting that often includes individuals from different backgrounds.

Prerequisites: None.

Professional Issues in Communicative Sciences and Disorders – 1 credit

This course is an overview of the regulations and requirements for professional practice in the field of communicative sciences and disorders. Topics include the major contemporary issues related to employment as a clinician in various settings, including professional competencies, ethical issues, conflict resolution, decision making, and interdisciplinary collaboration.

Prerequisites: None, although this course is taken once the practicum sequence is initiated.

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Clinical Courses

Clinical Practicum I: Pre-Clinic and On-Campus Clinical Immersion – 2 credits

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of the clinical experiences, including diagnostic principles and procedures in speech-language pathology and audiology. Building on working knowledge of information related to a variety of communication disorders, this course focuses on standardized tests and testing procedures, clinical writing, professionalism/interpersonal skills, and clinical materials and equipment. The clinical experience is introduced through a series of weekly seminars, videos, on-site client observations, and clinical practicum. The clinical practicum is supervised by ASHA-certified and New York State-licensed professionals.

Introductory clinical skills include case reviews, evaluation methods, mock diagnostic evaluation, interpersonal skills, professional client-clinician interaction, and clinical report writing.

Prerequisites: All foundation courses.
Pre- or corequisites: Adult Language Disorders, Language Disorders in Children, and Speech Sound Disorders in Children.

Clinical Practicum II: Diagnostic Assessment and On-Campus Clinical Immersion – 2 credits

Building on the knowledge and skills learned in Clinical Practicum I, learning is expanded to informal and dynamic assessment procedures, intervention planning, treatment development, and advanced clinical/professional writing. Clinical management skills for goal derivation, treatment planning, decision-making skills and opportunities for self-reflection are promoted. Students provide intervention to individuals with diverse communication disorders across the life span and perform independent diagnostic evaluations. Clinical immersions are supervised by ASHA-certified and New York State-licensed speech-language pathologists and audiologists. Skills include hands-on clinical assessment; diagnostic evaluations, clinical report writing.

Prerequisite: Clinical Practicum I: Pre-Clinic and On-Campus Clinical Immersion.

Clinical Field Placement III: Treatment – 2 credits

Students assume full case management responsibility for clients with diverse communication disorders and needs, refining diagnostic and goal writing skills, treatment management, and clinical decision making following ASHA guidelines. Student clinicians gain experience in off-campus community clinical settings and participate in an interactive weekly class meeting. Development of the supervisor and supervisee relationship is mentored in individual and/or small group supervisory conferences. Preparation for additional placements is fostered through interview readiness, on-the-job problem-solving skills, preparation for interdisciplinary team communication, and care-for-the-caregiver skills. Skills include hands-on clinical assessment and treatment, clinical report writing, caseload management, and community-based treatment.

Prerequisite: Clinical Practicum II: Diagnostic Assessment and On-Campus Clinical Immersion.

Clinical Field Placement IV: Pediatrics – 1 credit

This course allows students to apply learned knowledge and skills to real-life situations in a variety of pediatric settings, including schools, therapeutic preschool programs, and/or private practices. The interactive clinical seminar includes individual student case presentations, preparation for employment, and a clinical lecture series for shared experiences and knowledge. The placement is under the supervision of ASHA-certified and state-licensed speech-language pathologists in pediatric settings.

Prerequisite: Clinical Field Placement III: Treatment.

Clinical Field Placement V: Adults – 1 credit

This course allows students to apply learned knowledge and skills to real-life situations in a variety of adult settings, including hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, rehabilitation centers, and/or private practices. The interactive clinical seminar includes individual student case presentations, preparation for employment, and a clinical lecture series for shared experiences and knowledge. The placement is under the supervision of ASHA-certified and state-licensed speech-language pathologists in adult settings.

Prerequisite: Clinical Field Placement III: Treatment.

Clinical Field Placement VI – 1 credit

This course remains as a supplemental clinical field placement if additional clinical hours are needed to achieve the 375 contact hours. Content is consistent with the prior placements.

Prerequisites: Clinical Field Placement IV: Pediatrics and Clinical Field Placement V: Adults.

Learn more about clinical practicums and field placements.

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Elective Courses

Augmentative and Alternative Communication – 1 credit

This course provides a comprehensive overview of communicative approaches for individuals who are nonverbal or who have severe communications disorders. Special techniques and equipment are employed to allow these individuals to communicate effectively. A thorough examination of assessment and therapeutic process is presented, with emphasis on communication disorders secondary to congenital/acquired cognitive and motor impairments.

Prerequisites: All foundation courses and Language Disorders in Children.

Therapeutic Procedures in Speech Pathology: Aphasia – 2 credits

This course emphasizes the theoretical basis of therapy with the adult aphasic and practical application of those bases through the development of specific therapies for specific problems of aphasia. Information about credentials, ethical practices, and multicultural issues is addressed.

Prerequisites: All foundation courses and Adult Language Disorders.

Craniofacial Anomalies – 3 credits

This course offers analysis of etiological conceptions of cleft palate and orofacial anomalies related to articulatory and phonatory disorders. Clinical tests and procedures for general and specific therapy are explored.

Prerequisites: All foundation courses and Speech Sound Disorders in Children

Language and Communication in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) – 2 credits

This course offers an overview of current knowledge of ASD in the field of communication disorders and related areas. Students learn about current theories of underlying causal factors as well as different educational approaches and settings. Special emphasis is placed on language and communication skills as well as speech language pathology assessment and intervention. As part of the course requirements, students analyze individual case studies.

Prerequisites: All foundation courses and Language Disorders in Children.

Neurogenic Speech Disorders in Children – 2 credits

This course offers analysis of etiological conceptions of cerebral palsy and related linguistics, articulatory, and phonatory disorders. Clinical tests and procedures for general and specific therapy are explored.

Prerequisites: All foundation courses.

Computerized Analysis of Language Transcripts – 1 credit

This course is a detailed overview of technology-based methods for transcription and analysis of language samples in the assessment of communication disorders. The analysis of language samples collected during spontaneous speech production plays an important part in the assessment of such disorders and provides a key feature of research involving this population. Students will video-record an interaction between two speakers, learn to use digitalized image and sound for transcription of language samples, and use a computerized method (the SALT program) for analyzing language samples collected during spontaneous speech.

Prerequisites: All foundation courses and Language Disorders in Children.

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Departmental and Certification Courses

Master of Science Seminar – 0 credits

This course will serve as a forum to further meet the academic, professional, and personal needs of master of science students by providing the following: a thorough overview of university, departmental/program, and national/state accreditation requirements; advisement related to academic/professional pursuits; and resources related to the community in which they live and serve. As a result, this course will promote opportunities for student-student and student-faculty interactions to further enhance interpersonal and professional skills development and improve student satisfaction.

Drug and Alcohol Education, and Child Abuse and School Violence Protection – 0 credits

This course is an introduction to the role and responsibilities of teachers, school administrators, speech pathologists, and pupil personnel staff in the coordinated school health program. Course content examines strategies to prepare prospective educators for addressing mandated health subjects (e.g., recognition and prevention of substance abuse, HIV/AIDS, and child abduction; child abuse recognition; safety education; and violence prevention, including fire and arson prevention). The course meets NYS Education Department certification requirements for instruction in school violence prevention (two hours) and identification and reporting of child abuse (two hours). It fulfills the harassment, bullying, and discrimination prevention and intervention training required for certification/licensure under the Dignity for All Students Act (The Dignity Act). Three of the required six instructional hours are delivered through face-to-face instruction.

This course is taken concurrently with Clinical Practicum I: Pre-Clinic and On-Campus Immersion or Clinical Practicum II: Diagnostic Assessment and On-Campus Clinical Immersion.

Offered through the Department of Teaching and Learning.

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Additional ASHA and NYU Course Requirements

In addition to the courses listed above, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) requires you to have transcript credit (which could include course work, advanced placement, CLEP, or examination of equivalency) for each of the following areas: human/animal biological science, physical science, social/behavioral science, and statistics. NYU requires you to complete a minimum of 3 credits of course work in a language other than English as well. Please note that a grade of "C" or better must be earned in each of these courses to be considered by NYU.

These courses can be completed within one year of beginning the program and do not count toward graduate credit for the master’s degree. In addition to transcript credit, you may be required to provide further evidence of meeting this requirement.